Interdisciplinary Themes Journal, Vol 1, No 1 (2009)

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WALLED BLACK WORLD: HOSTILE URBAN ENVIRONMENT IN GLORIA NAYLOR’S THE WOMEN OF BREWSTER PLACE

Ana María Cotelo Cancela
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Abstract


Ecocriticism has a short life. It is, according to Cheryll Glotfelty, “the study of the relationship between literature and the physical environment” (1996, xix). After a first-wave of ecocritics analyzing the pastoral in literature, a second-wave started including urban environments. Since the formation of ASLE in the 1990s the ecological movement has gained importance and has evolved from an initial focus on “nature-oriented literature” to take into account urban as well as rural environments (Buell 2005, 7). Thus, from the study of the pristine wild woods of America, ecocritics have expanded their analyses to the gray concrete of American cities represented in its literature. This paper seeks to analyze hostile urban elements in Gloria Naylor’s The Women of Brewster Place (1982), considering them from an ecocritic point of view. Brewster Place was “cut off from the central activities of the city” by a wall, a mass of bricks that represents “segregation and isolation,” key factors of racial inequality in developed societies (Naylor 1982; Cole 2001). Gloria Naylor links brilliantly race, gender and hazardous environments in this text. Pikavippi 50e 30pv ota pikavippi fin-ov.com.


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